"MARLON BRANDO" enough said!

Marlon Brando on the set of Bedtime Story, 1964.

Marlon Brando on the set of Bedtime Story, 1964.


Marlon Brando, ca. 1955.

Marlon Brando, ca. 1955.

A Candid of Marlon Brando C.1950s
  • A Candid of Marlon Brando C.1950s
onlybrando:

Marlon Brando; Photographed by Lawrence Fried C.1950’s

onlybrando:

  • Marlon Brando; Photographed by Lawrence Fried C.1950’s

Marlon Brando in the February 1956 edition of the film magazine Modern Screen.

Marlon Brando in the February 1956 edition of the film magazine Modern Screen.

brandos:

Nothing says real love like a slap across the face. At least he really loved her? *lolshrug*

● Marlon Brando goofing around with Anna Magnani on the set of “The Fugitive kind” C.1959

brandos:

Nothing says real love like a slap across the face. At least he really loved her? *lolshrug*

● Marlon Brando goofing around with Anna Magnani on the set of “The Fugitive kind” C.1959
● Marlon Brando between takes while filming “The Freshman” circa 1989.

● Marlon Brando between takes while filming “The Freshman” circa 1989.


Marlon Brando in the February 1956 edition of the film magazine Modern Screen.

Marlon Brando posing with his nephew C.1952 in New York.

Marlon Brando in the February 1956 edition of the film magazine Modern Screen.

Marlon Brando posing with his nephew C.1952 in New York.

●A candid of  Marlon Brando Circa 1965.

●A candid of Marlon Brando Circa 1965.

whome1:

Marlon Brando photo negatives from Teahouse of an August Moon, 1950’s

Conscience. That stuff can drive you nuts.

● Marlon Brando in the backstage at The Oscar’s, Circa 1954.

● Marlon Brando in the backstage at The Oscar’s, Circa 1954.

whome1:

MB at the 1954 Oscars ceremony

● Marlon Brando along with his secretary Celia Meredith at the Oscar’s circa 1954.

whome1:

MB at the 1954 Oscars ceremony

● Marlon Brando along with his secretary Celia Meredith at the Oscar’s circa 1954.
brandomarlons:

Marlon Brando didn’t win the Academy Award in 1951 for his acting in “A Streetcar Named Desire.” The Oscar went to Humphrey Bogart, for “The African Queen.” But you could make a good case that no performance had more influence on modern film acting styles than Brando’s work as Stanley Kowalski, Tennessee Williams’ rough, smelly, sexually charged hero. 
Before this role, there was usually a certain restraint in American movie performances. Actors would portray violent emotions, but you could always sense to some degree a certain modesty that prevented them from displaying their feelings in raw nakedness. 
Brando held nothing back, and within a few years his was the style that dominated Hollywood movie acting. — Roger Ebert 

brandomarlons:

Marlon Brando didn’t win the Academy Award in 1951 for his acting in “A Streetcar Named Desire.” The Oscar went to Humphrey Bogart, for “The African Queen.” But you could make a good case that no performance had more influence on modern film acting styles than Brando’s work as Stanley Kowalski, Tennessee Williams’ rough, smelly, sexually charged hero.

Before this role, there was usually a certain restraint in American movie performances. Actors would portray violent emotions, but you could always sense to some degree a certain modesty that prevented them from displaying their feelings in raw nakedness.

Brando held nothing back, and within a few years his was the style that dominated Hollywood movie acting. — Roger Ebert